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repairing your credit report

building a better credit report

If you've ever applied for a credit card, a personal loan, or insurance, there's a file about you. This file is known as your credit report. It is chock full of information on where you live, how you pay your bills, and whether you've been sued or arrested, or have filed for bankruptcy. Credit reporting companies sell the information in your report to creditors, insurers, employers, and other businesses with a legitimate need for it. They use the information to evaluate your applications for credit, insurance, employment, or a lease.

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debt relief program advertising maY be offering bankruptcy

Consumer debt is at an all-time high. Whether your debt dilemma is the result of an illness, unemployment, or simply overspending, it can seem overwhelming. In your effort to get solvent, be on the alert for advertisements that offer seemingly quick fixes. While the ads pitch the promise of debt relief, they rarely say relief may be spelled b-a-n-k-r-u-p-t-c-y. And although bankruptcy is one option to deal with financial problems, it’s generally considered the option of last resort. The reason: its long-term negative impact on your creditworthiness. Bankruptcy information (both the date of your filing and the later date of discharge) stays on your credit report for 10 years, and can hinder your ability to get credit, a job, insurance, or even a place to live.

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bankruptcy as an option for debt relief

The consequences of bankruptcy are significant and require careful consideration. Other factors to think about: Effective October 2005, Congress made sweeping changes to the bankruptcy laws. The net effect of these changes is to give consumers more incentive to seek bankruptcy relief under Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7. 

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choosing a credit counselor

Living paycheck to paycheck? Worried about debt collectors? Can’t seem to develop a workable budget, let alone save money for retirement? If this sounds familiar, you may want to consider the services of a credit counselor. Many credit counseling organizations are nonprofit and work with you to solve your financial problems. But beware — just because an organization says it is “nonprofit” doesn’t guarantee that its services are free or affordable, or that its services are legitimate. In fact, some credit counseling organizations charge high fees, some of which may be hidden, or urge consumers to make “voluntary” contributions that cause them to fall deeper into debt.

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fixing a bad credit report

Reviewing your credit report may have confirmed your fears. Although you can't erase all of the bad information, there are some steps you can take to make the situation better.

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American Consumer Credit Counseling (ACCC) provides nonprofit credit counseling, debt management services, credit relief and debt relief help to consumers nationwide. Our free credit counseling services help individuals and families learn how to manage debt more effectively and how to get rid of debt more quickly. Our certified credit counselors show consumers the various ways to pay off debt, and we offer affordable debt management programs for getting rid of credit card debt by consolidating debt payments. Our debt negotiation services help with managing credit card debt and paying off debt more quickly by reducing interest rates and finance charges. And our financial education services help consumers manage money more effectively, find reputable debt consolidation companies and answer questions like "How do you consolidate debt?"

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